TAST 2010 Week 30 Eastern Stitch

I have another variation to try out today as Eastern stitch is a cousin to Sorbello stitch. Many people think of this stitch as an evenweave stitch that has to be worked on a grid but it will follow a softly curved line too.

Work this stitch from left to right. When working this stitch it needs to kept at a fairly loose tension.

Bring the thread through from the back of the fabric and make a vertical straight stitch at the left side of an imaginary square.

Next make a horizontal straight stitch at the top of an imaginary square.

These two stitches form the foundation bars of each unit.

Taking the needle diagonally across the back of the fabric, bring the thread up through the fabric, to the bottom right-hand corner.

Take the needle over the top and under the vertical stitch, making sure the thread is kept to the top of the needle. this means that when you pull it through it forms a loop over the vertical bar stitch as illustrated.

Next move to the horizontal bar and take the needle over the top and under the horizontal stitch making sure the thread is kept to the right of the needle so that when you pull it through it forms a loop over the horizontal stitch as illustrated

Take the thread through the fabric at the bottom right-hand corner bringing it out at the top left corner of the next stitch and repeat the process.

You can work along a line or a curve

How to join in. 

Work an example of the stitch. Experiment a bit, photograph it, and put it on your flickr site or write about it on your blog.

Please remember to link back to here so others can find the challenge too.

Come here to this post and leave a comment to tell everyone where your site is. (Click on the title and it will take you to this post on an individual page if you bookmark it you can find it again)

Also now if you leave your full address ie include the http:// bit in your address it will become a link automatically.

Visit a few sites of people who have already left a comment. See what they have done. I am sure everyone will enjoy following the links left in the comments. If you have time, let other people know that you have seen their work on their site.

Other groups and networks

You can also share your explorations with other members on  stitchin fingers group and the flickr TAST site

All posts relating to this challenge are in the Take a Stitch Tuesday category

TAST 2010 Week 29 Raised Chain Variation

I feel like some sort of cheat today as I published week 29 last week I dont have my usual last minute panic. Something feels odd … grins to self

I have an idea …

I would like to point people to – I floated this idea over on stitchin fingers and would love feedback. Leave a message in the forum or here in the comments. I know it takes a little time but I would love peoples thoughts.

Anyway as I explained last week I posted two stitches because Raised chain had 2 versions. Week 28 was one version and week 29 another.

Just incase you missed it here is how to Raised chain version 2.

How to work Raised Chain version 2

In this version of Raised chain stitch the surface produced is raised but smooth and the stitches look like chain stitches.

You can find this version of Raised chain stitch in the A-Z of Embroidery Stitches Volume 2 p. 114

Work this stitch from top to bottom. Use a blunt tapestry needle to avoid splitting the foundation stitches.  Bring your needle to the front at the top of the foundation row

First work a ladder of straight stitches as a foundation

To start off slide your needle under two foundations stitches.

With the working thread wrapped under the needle pull your needle through to form a chain stitch. You are not going the fabric.

Continue forming these chained stitches down the ladder until you reach the end of the row.

When you have the first row done fasten off the last stitch with a small vertical stitch and take your thread to the back, tie off.

Restart at the top of the ladder and work row upon row until the foundation ladder is packed.

As you can see this stitch looks very effective in a hand dyed multicoloured thread.

How to join in. 

Work an example of the stitch. Experiment a bit, photograph it, and put it on your flickr site or write about it on your blog.

Please remember to link back to here so others can find the challenge too.

Come here to this post and leave a comment to tell everyone where your site is. (Click on the title and it will take you to this post on an individual page if you bookmark it you can find it again)

Also now if you leave your full address ie include the http:// bit in your address it will become a link automatically.

Visit a few sites of people who have already left a comment. See what they have done. I am sure everyone will enjoy following the links left in the comments. If you have time, let other people know that you have seen their work on their site.

Other groups and networks

You can also share your explorations with other members on  stitchin fingers group and the flickr TAST site

All posts relating to this challenge are in the Take a Stitch Tuesday category

 

TAST 2010 Week 28 and 29 Raised Chain and variation

This week I am posting two challenge stitches because Raised chain has 2 versions. Week 28 is a verison of Raised chain that is found in many stitch dictionaries.

Week 29 is a version that I was shown years ago and to my delight is published in the A-Z of Embroidery Stitches Volume 2. This makes it legit in my eyes shifting it from a quirky Aussie version to another handy variety. It makes a raised but flat surface.

I have decided to publish these both together today, because I know if I do one without the other someone will ask if I know the other version!

So this week I have week 28 Raised Chain an week 29 is Raised Chain version 2

Both have their merits and both can add texture to a piece.

How to work Raised Chain stitch (week 28)

You will find this version in The Embroidery Stitch Bible by Betty Barnden p111

First work a ladder of straight stitches as a foundation.

 

Work this stitch from top to bottom.

Use a blunt tapestry needle to avoid splitting the foundation stitches.

Bring your needle to the front of the fabric, at the top of the foundation row.

Take your thread over the top of the first bar and thread the needle under it.

You are not going the fabric.

Pull the needle under the bar.

On the other side of the little loop stitch you just made  pass your needle under the foundation bar again.

Once again you are not going the fabric.

With the working thread under the needle pull your needle through to form your first stitch.

You are not going the fabric.

Continue this way down the ladder of foundation stitches.

When you have the first row done fasten off the last stitch with a small vertical stitch and take your thread to the back, tie off.

Restart at the top of the ladder and work row upon row until the foundation ladder is packed.

How to work Raised Chain stitch version 2 (week 29)

In this version of Raised chain stitch the surface produced is raised but smooth and the stitches look like chain stitches.

You can find this version of Raised chain stitch in the A-Z of Embroidery Stitches Volume 2 p. 114

Work this stitch from top to bottom. Use a blunt tapestry needle to avoid splitting the foundation stitches.  Bring your needle to the front at the top of the foundation row

First work a ladder of straight stitches as a foundation

To start off slide your needle under two foundations stitches.

With the working thread wrapped under the needle pull your needle through to form a chain stitch. You are not going the fabric.

Continue forming these chained stitches down the ladder until you reach the end of the row.

When you have the first row done fasten off the last stitch with a small vertical stitch and take your thread to the back, tie off.

Restart at the top of the ladder and work row upon row until the foundation ladder is packed.

As you can see this stitch looks very effective in a hand dyed multicoloured thread.

How to join in. 

Work an example of the stitch. Experiment a bit, photograph it, and put it on your flickr site or write about it on your blog.

Please remember to link back to here so others can find the challenge too.

Come here to this post and leave a comment to tell everyone where your site is. (Click on the title and it will take you to this post on an individual page if you bookmark it you can find it again)

Also now if you leave your full address ie include the http:// bit in your address it will become a link automatically.

Visit a few sites of people who have already left a comment. See what they have done. I am sure everyone will enjoy following the links left in the comments. If you have time, let other people know that you have seen their work on their site.

Other groups and networks

You can also share your explorations with other members on  stitchin fingers group and the flickr TAST site

All posts relating to this challenge are in the Take a Stitch Tuesday category