TAST 2010 Week 39 and 40 Buttonhole Picots

Today we have two weeks of stitches, mainly because there are three versions of doing this that I know of and possibly more.  So rather than holding one over until next week and risk someone shaking their head, muttering to themselves, and saying it is not the way they do do it. I thought I would share the two main versions of buttonhole picots that I use.

The first version and the one most often documented has a picot made of a bullion stitch the second version is easier to work as the picot is made of three chain stitches. There is another woven method of making a picot (woven over a pin)  but I am not covering that version at the moment.

The second version interests me as I was shown the second version when young and I often wonder if this is an Australian / New Zealand version as I have seen it in Australian stitch magazines and Janet M. Davies of JMD Designs has this version on her site.

All samples worked using cotton perle # 5

Most often this stitch is worked along an edge so the buttonhole stitches are usually worked close together. For purposes of demonstration I have spaced them a little apart so you can see how the picot stitches are worked.

In all versions you space the picot knots as required along a line of buttonhole.

Version 1 Picot made with a bullion knot   

Start with buttonhole, when you reach the point where you want to add a picot commencing with the thread under the needle wrap the needle 2 or 3 times to create a bullion knot.

Push the knot wraps snug to the buttonhole  and pull the thread through. You may need to hold the needle flat to the fabric with your thumb as you pull through.

Slide your needle from left to right under the last stitch and keeping the thread under the needle pull it through. If you need to push the knot up snug do so with either your needle or thumb.

Continue along the line working the next section of buttonhole.

Buttonhole stitch with Picots version 2 (picot made with chain stitches) 

This is similar but I think easier as the picot knot is formed with a chain stitch.

The illustration samples are worked using cotton perle # 5.

As with the previous version you space the picot knots as required along a line of buttonhole. Also usually the buttonhole stitches are worked close together as an edging stitch. For purposes of demonstration I have spaced them a little apart so you can see how the picot stitches are worked

Start with buttonhole, when you reach the point where you want to add a picot slide your needle under the the thread of the last buttonhole stitch but not through the fabric.

With the thread under the needle pull your needle through so that you make a little chain stitch using the buttonhole as a foundation.

Insert your needle into the centre of the chain stitch but not through the fabric. Wrap your thread under the needle and pull your needle through to make a second chain stitch.

If you want a larger knot you can make a third chain.

Next slide your needle from right to left under the last stitch and keeping the thread under the needle pull it through. If you need to push the knot up snug do so with either your needle or thumb.

Recommence regular buttonhole stitch and bring your needle tip out next to the picot  and continue along the line working the next section of buttonhole.

As you can see the knot stands a little proud and personally I always find the rhythm of the second version easier than the first.

How to join in. 

Work an example of the stitch. Experiment a bit, photograph it, and put it on your flickr site or write about it on your blog.

Please remember to link back to here so others can find the challenge too.

Come here to this post and leave a comment to tell everyone where your site is. (Click on the title and it will take you to this post on an individual page if you bookmark it you can find it again)

Also now if you leave your full address ie include the http:// bit in your address it will become a link automatically.

Visit a few sites of people who have already left a comment. See what they have done. I am sure everyone will enjoy following the links left in the comments. If you have time, let other people know that you have seen their work on their site.

Other groups and networks

You can also share your explorations with other members on  stitchin fingers group and the flickr TAST site

All posts relating to this challenge are in the Take a Stitch Tuesday category

 


TAST 2010 Week 37 Kiko’s Flower Stitch

I think the crazy quilters will love this stitch. I have not seen this composite stitch documented,  but it’s so nice I am including it in this years challenge.

This stitch was shown to me by a lady from Japan. Her English was not good but she called it flower stitch because worked in a ring it can form a flower. True  to skills handed on in the oral tradition I call it Kiko’s flower stitch.

If anyone knows where this stitch has been documented I would love to know its name.

You need to know how to make a bullion knot to work this stitch.

The illustration sample is worked in perle #5 cotton

Start off with a detached chain stitch.


Keeping on a curve (as illustrated) insert the needle at the base of the chain stitch and bringing the point out on the outer edge wrap the thread under the needle to make two buttonhole wheel stitches in a small fan shape.


On the outer edge insert the needle into stitches as illustrated.


Make a bullion knot to catch the stitches down.


This unit is what Kiko called a stitch and she worked them in units of 4, 5 or 6.
As you can see it makes a nice shape for a textured flower just ad some French knots or beads to the middle.

I hope you enjoy this weeks stitch!

How to join in. 

Work an example of the stitch. Experiment a bit, photograph it, and put it on your flickr site or write about it on your blog.

Please remember to link back to here so others can find the challenge too.

Come here to this post and leave a comment to tell everyone where your site is. (Click on the title and it will take you to this post on an individual page if you bookmark it you can find it again)

Also now if you leave your full address ie include the http:// bit in your address it will become a link automatically.

Visit a few sites of people who have already left a comment. See what they have done. I am sure everyone will enjoy following the links left in the comments. If you have time, let other people know that you have seen their work on their site.

Other groups and networks

You can also share your explorations with other members on  stitchin fingers group and the flickr TAST site

All posts relating to this challenge are in the Take a Stitch Tuesday category


TAST 2010 Week 36 Turkman Stitch

I have a simpler stitch this week but no less interesting. Some people classify Turkman stitch as a form of double chain and others classify it as a closed feather stitch (including me in the stitch dictionary). Some books have the point of the needle angled further inwards for double chain and for Turkman the point of the needle follows the outer edge of the line.

In many ways depending on how you view this stitch it could be either. So I have decided to introduce it as Turkamen stitch. How is that for being consistent!

Turkman stitch can be used as a linear stitch and as a filling. It will also follow a gentle curve.

Unlike last weeks stitch Turkman stitch is simple and quick to work. It is worked between two imaginary parallel lines down the fabric swinging back and forth, from side to side.

Bring the needle out at the top left line, and insert the needle on the right line and make a small vertical stitch in a downward motion, so that the needle point reappears on the right line.


Keeping the thread under the needle point pull the thread through the fabric to make the first stitch.

Next, insert the needle on the left line, very close to where the thread emerged and make a small vertical stitch in a downward motion so that the needle point reappears on the left line.


Keeping the thread under the needle point, pull the thread through the fabric to make the stitch.

Insert the needle on the right line, catching the loop and make a small vertical stitch in a downward motion so that the needle point reappears on the right line.

Work these movements alternatively down the row but notice that as the row is worked each stitch catches the previous stitch.

I hope you enjoy this weeks stitch!

How to join in. 

Work an example of the stitch. Experiment a bit, photograph it, and put it on your flickr site or write about it on your blog.

Please remember to link back to here so others can find the challenge too.

Come here to this post and leave a comment to tell everyone where your site is. (Click on the title and it will take you to this post on an individual page if you bookmark it you can find it again)

Also now if you leave your full address ie include the http:// bit in your address it will become a link automatically.

Visit a few sites of people who have already left a comment. See what they have done. I am sure everyone will enjoy following the links left in the comments. If you have time, let other people know that you have seen their work on their site.

Other groups and networks

You can also share your explorations with other members on  stitchin fingers group and the flickr TAST site

All posts relating to this challenge are in the Take a Stitch Tuesday category