Take a stitch Tuesday Challenge week 17

Sorry for the late post this morning I have had trouble getting to my own site!

This week I thought I would give everyone a simple stitch. This has to be one of the simplest stitches used in embroidery and it is used throughout the world. This week the challenge stitch is Running stitch. The challenge with this stitch is more what you can do with it rather than master how to do it which I am sure many people will find a relief. For new hands this stitch is easy.

It is a deceptively simple stitch which can be worked in freeform meandering tracks, looks good layered at different angles and when worked in a regular fashion patterns can easily be created.

This easily developed patterning makes the stitch ideal for simple and quick borders

This sample is worked using a fine embroidery wool. Many patterns of running stitch have been developed into pattern darning. The ANG site has published some ideas for patterns While I am dishing out links you might like to read a little about the historical aspects of pattern darning

You can also whip or thread this stitch easily and worked row upon row creates an interesting filling. The sample below is worked on linen and running stitch has been threaded with various yarns.

For those interested in contemporary embroidery this sample also features threaded running stitch threaded with various weights of thread.

You can also lace the stitch in a number of ways (some are listed in my stitch dictionary) Here I have used double running stitch which has been laced to create a seam embellishment on a crazy quilt block.

When you have stitched a sample swing by and leave a comment (preferably on this post) so people can check out your site. Don’t forget to leave your URL. To avoid spam you must be registered to leave a comment and all comments are moderated. This means when I have read them I approve them and they are published.

Don’t forget that Debra Spincic generously runs a web ring for the TAST challenge which is found here and for those who have a Flickr account there is the Take a stitch Tuesday flickr group

 

That’s the Take a Stitch Tuesday Challenge stitch this week …as usual experiment, explore and Enjoy!


 

Take a stitch Tuesday Challenge week 16

No doubt people are swinging by this morning the check out what the stitch is for this week.

Without further fuss, this week the challenge stitch is Palestrina stitch. Some found last weeks stitch a challenge I hope this one won’t be too much.

This stitch is a textured stitch which holds a curve well. This sample is worked in perle 5 cotton.

It is a stitch that looks quite complex but once you are in the swing of it is enjoyable and relaxing.

I really like it because it forms a ridge of knots. It can be worked with the first bar quite small so that on the finished stitch you do not see the arms.

In the samples I have left the arms wide so that you can see what is happening.

If you widen the stitch it becomes very interesting. For instance you can change the length of the arms, swing them from side to side and generally have fun with them.

For new hands this stitch works best in a thread with firm twist although most thread types are suitable and you can be quite creative with this stitch. This sample (above) worked in perle 8 thread on aida cloth.

If you work the stitch on a curve and change the size of the arms it becomes very twiggy and organic which makes it ideal in floral sprays etc

If you work this stitch row upon row and extend the arms of the stitch you can overlap the arms with the previous row producing an interesting texture. This sample is worked in wool on a foundation cloth of linen which has been hand painted.

Here I have used the stitch as a seam embellishment on a crazy quilt block.

When you have stitched a sample swing by and leave a comment (preferably on this post) so people can check out your site. Don’t forget to leave your URL. To avoid spam you must be registered to leave a comment and all comments are moderated. This means when I have read them I approve them and they are published.

Don’t forget that Debra Spincic generously runs a web ring for the TAST challenge which is found here and for those who have a Flickr account there is the Take a stitch Tuesday flickr group

That’s the Take a Stitch Tuesday Challenge stitch this week …as usual experiment, explore and Enjoy!


Take a stitch Tuesday Challenge week 15

Good morning everyone! Imagine I am doing my best imitation of Robin Williams greeting in Good Morning Vietnam. Screaming at my computer screen, then feeling a little daft, I look around and shrug. No harm done and it woke me up. Now you have that image in your head, I swing my chair around (I have one of those swivel chairs), pull myself towards the desk (yes it has wheels too!) hitch my sleeves up to the elbow (habit) and settle down to announce this weeks challenge stitch.

Last night I spent some time really poking about the sites that have been joining in on this challenge. It really is fantastic to see so many interpretations.

I hope these slightly more complex stitches are not too frustrating for new hands to embroidery. The majority of people seem to be having fun with them. I am thoroughly enjoying following the links as I approve the comments.

This week the challenge stitch is oyster stitch. Most often you encounter this stitch worked in singles arranged in a circle to produce flowers. This sample is worked in perle 5 cotton with a center of French knots.

It is a stitch that looks quite complex but once you are in the swing of it is enjoyable and relaxing.

This stitch is a highly textured complex form of chain stitch. This sample is worked in wool, perle 5 cotton, silk, and linen threads stacking the stitches close together.

For new hands this stitch works best in a thread with firm twist although most thread types are suitable and you can be quite creative with this stitch. This is simply a straight line worked in perle 8 thread on aida cloth.

On this sample worked on Aida, I have worked the stitches separately on an angle and simply extended them slightly.

As you can see in the sample above you can easily work this stitch in a spiral.

If you extend the tail of the stitch ie the thread you use to tie the stitch down all sorts of interesting arrangements can be created. These samples worked on dress linen are worked in a circle but worked as a linear stitch it can be worked on a curve, worked in a zig zag formation, or you can weave threads under it. Worked as a isolated stitch it can be arranged in patterns or sprinkled across an area in singles.

These flower buds is Oyster stitch worked in a chenille thread.

Here I have some more crazy quilt seam embellishments both using ribbon floss to work the Oyster stitch.

Click through to the directions on how to do the challenge stitch oyster stitch in my stitch dictionary.

When you have stitched a sample swing by and leave a comment (preferably on this post) so people can check out your site. Don’t forget to leave your URL. To avoid spam you must be registered to leave a comment and all comments are moderated. This means when I have read them I approve them and they are published.

Don’t forget that Debra Spincic generously runs a web ring for the TAST challenge which is found here and for those who have a Flickr account there is the Take a stitch Tuesday flickr group

That’s the Take a Stitch Tuesday Challenge stitch this week …as usual experiment, explore and Enjoy!