Up and Down Buttonhole Stitch

up and down buttonhole sampleUp and down buttonhole is a variation of buttonhole stitch which is also known as Mirrored buttonhole stitch. Up and Down Buttonhole is easily worked on all types of fabrics. The line this stitch forms is made up of a pair of stitches which are crossed with a tie at the base. Up and down buttonhole is an incredibly versatile stitch. It is simple to work yet a little unusual. Do  look at the directions as this is not two buttonhole stitches close together or with simple tied bar. The stitch can be worked in a square or long a line as illustrated below.

How to work Up and Down Buttonhole Stitch

Work this stitch from left to right. Each stitch of the pair is separate step. Up and down buttonhole step 1Starting as you would with buttonhole work the first stitch of the pair as a regular buttonhole stitch with your needle pointing downwards wrap the thread under the needle and pull the needle through. Up and down buttonhole step 2For the second part of the stitch, insert the needle and take a bite of the fabric so that the tip of the needle is pointing upwards as illustrated. Up and down buttonhole step 3Wrap the working thread under the needle and pull the needle through the foundation fabric. As you pull the needle through pull the needle towards you instead of away from you. As you do this hold down the loop that forms with the left thumb to prevent it slipping. The loop forms as you stitch. Up and down buttonhole step 4Note I have noticed online that some instructions create a loop then lace the working thread through the stitch. This is wrong the loop is created as you stitch and once you have the rhythm of the stitch it is easy and quick to do. This loop forms the bar at the base of both stitches. This forms the first pair of tied stitches. Up and down buttonhole step 5Work along the line. Once you have the rhythm of the stitch it is easy and quick to do. Up and down buttonhole sample 5As I have said Up and down buttonhole is an incredibly versatile stitch. Along a line the spines can change angle or length. Up and down buttonhole sample 3The stitch is easily worked in a circle with spines pointing inwards or outwards. Up and down buttonhole sample 2You can also work it along a curve.   Up and down buttonhole sample 4 Return to Stitch Dictionary Index page

Have you seen my Stitchers Templates?

marking a seam using my stitchers Templates As someone who loves crazy quilting and embroidery, I designed these templates with other stitchers in mind. With my templates, you can create hundreds of different patterns to apply to your stitching and crazy quilting projects. They are easy to use, totally clear so you can position them easily and they are compact in your sewing box. Templates set 1 you will find here  Templates set 2 you will find here  a tangle of pinsFollow Pintangle and have it delivered to your inbox You can have Pintangle delivered to your inbox by using the ‘follow’ feature in the sidebar. Just enter your email address, and when you get the confirmation email make sure you say yes and you are all set! If you are on a mobile or tablet you will need to scroll to the bottom to find the ‘follow’ feature.

SaveSave

SaveSave

How to hand embroider Bonnet stitch

 Bonnet stitch sample 5Bonnet stitch is a variation of buttonhole that forms a line of stitches which have a upright twisted looped prongs. Jan Eaton in her Complete Stitch Encyclopedia states that she found this stitch in a 1923 issue of Embroidery Magazine.

Some stitches you look at the directions and they look distinctly uninspiring. Bonnet stitch is such a case. It looks like a double buttonhole or I call it a herringbone with its knickers in twist. However I urge you to try it out I think it will surprise you. You can use this stitch on even-weave or plain fabrics. It is quick and easy to work and will follow a curve well.

 Bonnet stitch sample 3Bonnet stitch looks best in a thread with firm twist. So if you are one of those folks using up old stranded embroidery threads to test your stitches I can only encourage you to buy some perle thread. You are doing yourself a huge disservice if you never try other threads. Many of the surface stitches look nothing in stranded threads but work them in a thread with a firm twist and they come alive.

The sample is of Bonnet stitch worked in different threads. The first row is cotton Perle 8, the next rayon thread, followed by silk and the last row being a metallic.

 Bonnet stitch sample 2Since Bonnet stitch is a member of the buttonhole family, it can be worked easily on a curve. If worked in freeform manner you can produce organic textured lines.

 Bonnet stitch sample 1Also you can easily work this stitch in a circle.

How to work Bonnet Stitch

Work bonnet stitch from right to left between two imaginary lines. If you need to mark the line use a pen that will dissolve when moist or one of the quilters pen that disappear after a few days.
instructions on how to work Bonnet stitch 1Bring the needle out on the bottom line. Make a small stitch on the top line with the needle pointing left.
instructions on how to work Bonnet stitch 2Pull the needle through the fabric.
Slide the needle under the straight stitch you just made. You are not taking the needle through the fabric just slide it under the stitch with the needle pointing left. Pull the needle through.
instructions on how to work Bonnet stitch 3On the bottom line insert the needle where you started to stitch.  With the needle pointed left and the thread wrapped under the needle as illustrated, pull the needle through.

instructions on how to work Bonnet stitch 4
Take the needle to the top line and take a bite of the fabric as illustrated. This is the start of th enext stitch.

instructions on how to work Bonnet stitch 5Continue along the line.

Bonnet stitch can be worked in rows or at different heights. Think of all the patterns you make with Buttonhole stitch as many of these you can adapt to  Bonnet stitch too. It is a case of experimenting a little.  It is also interesting if you work Bonnet stitch at different angles or use it to couch heavy threads to the fabric.

 Bonnet stitch sample 4You can create patterns if you work this stitch row upon row or in this case in rows back to back.

 




How to Hand Embroider Palestrina Stitch

Palestrina stitch Version 2 sample 6After fussing and carrying on and spending and age hunched over various stitch dictionaries I have decided that there are two versions of Palestrina stitch. One is worked vertically producing a neat knotted line and the second is worked horizontally producing  a knotted line. Each knot has an ‘arm’ that can be varied in length to add variety and interest to the stitch.

Both versions produce an interesting textured line that will hold a curve well and both versions look quite complex but once you are in the swing of it are enjoyable and fun. You are not restricted to even-weave fabrics as it is easily worked on many types of fabric forming a characteristic attractive knotted line.

Palestrina stitch can be used as a linear stitch or to outline shapes in a design. A firm twisted thread, such as pearl cotton, show the knots to their best advantage.The thickness of your thread will change the look of this stitch.

I really like Palestrina stitch because it forms a ridge of knots. In this sample Palestrina is worked in Ecru perle #3 thread and forms a line of knots.

Palestrina stitch Version 1sample

 

How to work Palestrina stitch version 1

Palestrina stitch Version 1 tutorial step 1Start by making a short straight vertical stitch. Bring your needle from the back slightly to the left of the stitch and pull the thread through.

Palestrina stitch Version 1 tutorial step 2Slide your needle under the straight stitch from right to left. Do not pick up any of the fabric at this point.

Palestrina stitch Version 1 tutorial step 3Pull the thread through so that a loop forms around the straight stitch. You are wrapping the stitch with the thread. Pull the wrap snug but not too tight.

Palestrina stitch Version 1 tutorial step 4Slide your needle from right to left diagonally under the straight stitch. Keep your needle above the loop and again, don’t pick up any of the fabric.

Palestrina stitch Version 1 tutorial step 5

With your thread under the needle pull the needle through to form a snug knot.

Palestrina stitch Version 1 tutorial step6Insert your needle below the knot and take it to the back to create the vertical stitch, on which to make the next knot

Palestrina stitch Version 1 tutorial step 7Bring the needle out on the left side of the stitch and repeat each knot down the line.

How to work Palestrina stitch version 2 or Long Legged Palestrina

Work the stitch from left to right, along a line.

Palestrina stitch Version 2 tutorial step 1Bring the needle up through the fabric and make a small stitch diagonal stitch before taking the needle to the back of the fabric. This forms the first bar on to which the stitch is made.

Palestrina stitch Version 2 tutorial step 2Bring your needle up again at the base of the diagonal stitch (see the illustration). From the top slide the needle under the diagonal stitch. When you pass the needle under the bar this movement will take your thread over the top of the bar.

Palestrina stitch Version 2 tutorial step 3Once again pass the needle under the bar. Loop the thread under the needle and pull the needle under the bar. Pull the thread snug to form a knot. Take the needle to the back of  the fabric

Palestrina stitch Version 2 tutorial step 4Move along the line make a second bar on to which you work your knot.

In the illustrations I have used quite large foundation stitches so that people can see how the stitch is made. Space the knots evenly and close together to produce a textured line.The knots can be worked closely together to produce a heavy line or spaced quite far apart.

Palestrina  long legged sample Most of my samples are worked in perle #5 cotton but I often try it in thicker yarns (like knitting wool!) of perle #3 cotton.

 

You can change the size of the arms to add textural interest and to create patterns or add beads.

 

 

Palestrina stitch Version 2 sample 4As I have already said Palestrina stitch is a textured stitch which holds a curve well.

Palestrina stitch Version 2 sample 5If you widen the stitch it becomes very interesting. For instance you can change the length of the arms. If you work the stitch on a curve and change the size of the arms it becomes very twiggy and organic which makes it ideal in floral sprays etc.

Palestrina stitch Version 2 sample 1You can also work this stitch on evenweave fabric . This sample is worked on hand dyed Aida cloth

Palestrina stitch Version 2 sample 2The next sample is on the same cloth but every second stitch has extended arms in order to crate a pattern.

Palestrina stitch Version 2 sample 3Palestrina Stitch It is a stitch found often on Italian embroidery – hence the name but it is also known as Double knot stitch, Tied coral stitch, Old English knot stitch, Smyrna stitch and it is also the stitch used in Twilling so it is called Twilling Stitch.  If the bars are extended and well above the knot (as they are in the illustrations) this stitch becomes Long Armed Palestrina stitch and if the bars are long and below the knot it becomes Long Legged Palestrina stitch.

Which ever version you use I hope you enjoy the Palestrina stitch.