A full view

Diamond block crazy quiltAs I promised in my last post about my diamond quilt here is a photo of the diamond quilt on the wall.

Click on the image and you will be taken to a larger photograph.

The ACT Embroiderers’ Guild had a lovely evening with the exhibition being opened by Senator Kate Lundy.

I will be back there on Saturday morning demonstrating crazy quilting for anyone who is interested. So if you are local and feel like some free tips look for me in the demonstration area at the back of the hall and feel free to say hello.

Today I start planing the next crazy quilt!

The back story

If you are interested in the back story of this quilt you will find it all in the Diamond block crazy quilt category

This series of posts on How to assemble a Crazy Quilt includes 

Online Crazy Quilting Classes:

Just a quick reminder for those who are interested in taking a class with me. You will find all my classes listed under the top tab imaginatively titled Classes online you will also find information on how online classes are run.

Work in Progress Wednesday : Catching the false back and binding

At a quarter to midnight last night I finished binding the quilt.

Last week I showed how I  was tying/quilting the crazy quilt and was ready  to attach a false back to hide the mess.

Over this week past, I caught the false back to the quilt sandwich at the point of each diamond and hid that point with a bead. Each point has one of these gold disks held on with a seed bead, the threads runs through the quilt to the back where it is secured with another seed bead.

This is the bead at the back as I am working it.

This is how it looks when done. as you can see the bead at the back catches the false back to the quilt sandwich.

Stitches are NOT seen from the front. As each stitch is hidden behind a bead or button.As you can see it looks quite neat

From here on most of the techniques used are standard quilting techniques. I have not fully described these as there is oodles of information out there on how to put a quilt together and bind it. The main difference with the way I put together a crazy quilt is that I herringbone flat the seams and have a false back. (I have explained this in weeks past. Links to these explanations are at the bottom of the post)

After stitching each point of all the diamonds I added the rod pocket. The rod pocket was stitched through the false back and the real back. Of course the rod pocket takes the weight of the quilt so it would be silly to just stitch it through just the false back.

I made two long pockets so that the weight was distributed evenly. I have taken this photo on the table so you can see what I mean. The rod will hang from three points. A point each side and a point in the middle. The rod pockets run the width of the quilt.

Once the rod pocket was attached I cut out the binding on the bias. I made this from the same fabric that I used along the inside edge of the border. I pieced it together in a long strip and then bound the quilt as you would a normal quilt. The top of the rod pocket is bound into the binding.

Since I finished the quilt late last night I don’t have any full shots but plan to get some taken at the Embroiderers Guild Show tomorrow. Since I am helping hang the exhibition I am sure no one will mind if I faff around with my camera a bit.

I am demonstrating at the Guild Exhibition:

For those who are local and interested in crazy quilting I will be at the exhibition demonstrating crazy quilting for anyone who is interested. I will be there Saturday morning so if you feel like some free tips look for me and feel free to say hello.

Until then I thought readers might enjoy some eye candy.

 

Diamond block crazy quilt

Here is the finished quilt click on the image and you will taken to larger photo. I hope you enjoy seeing it.

The back story

If you are interested in the back story of this quilt and seeing photos of each block as it was made browse the posts  in the Diamond block crazy quilt category

Posts on How to assemble a Crazy Quilt which include;

Online Crazy Quilting Classes:

Just a quick reminder for those who are interested in taking a class with me. You will find all my classes listed under the top tab imaginatively titled Classes online you will also find information on how online classes are run.

Work in Progress Wednesday – Tying the quilt

Last week I showed how I added the border and  was tying/quilting the crazy quilt. Well I am done and now have to attach the false back to hide the mess. Before started that part of the process, I thought I would share a photo so you can see what I mean by mess.

As I said at the time these stitches are NOT seen from the front. As each stitch is hidden behind a bead or button.

Yesterday afternoon I finished doing this. I then pressed the fabric I am going to use for the false back, it is the blue fabric you can see on the edge.  I laid it out, and pinned the quilt sandwich to it ready for the next stage.

So now you can see it on the table looking much as it did last week but there is a lot of hidden work between the back and the false back.

Now I will catch the false back to the quilt at the point of each diamond. Then make the binding and bind the quilt. Not much more to do.

 

Diamond block crazy quilt

Here is the finished quilt click on the image and you will taken to larger photo. I hope you enjoy seeing it.

The back story

If you are interested in the back story of this quilt and seeing photos of each block as it was made browse the posts  in the Diamond block crazy quilt category

Posts on How to assemble a Crazy Quilt which include;

Online Crazy Quilting Classes:

Just a quick reminder for those who are interested in taking a class with me. You will find all my classes listed under the top tab imaginatively titled Classes online you will also find information on how online classes are run.

Work in Progress Wednesday: Assembling a crazy quilt, tying the quilt sandwich

Last week, I was at the stage where I was still using herringbone to stitch flat the seams.  This task is now thankfully done.

Once I had the the quilt top assembled it was time to add the border.

Normally a contemporary quilt is made of quilting cottons. This is not the case with crazy quilts, as all sorts of materials can be used. Not only a huge range of luxurious and highly textured fabrics available to the modern crazy quilter but also buttons, charms and beads are often added. This makes for a heavy piece of work, so when assembling the quilt this aspect of crazy quilting has to be thought about.

Since I like to embellish my quilts and my blocks are often heavy I chose a  maroon cotton brocade for the fabric used in the border. It is a firm, solid curtain fabric.  I wanted a strong fabric to both support the quilt and balance the weight of the blocks aesthetically.

I mentioned last week I was going to have a inner border and binding is a burnt gold paisley. When piecing the diamond blocks I used paisley patterned fabrics throughout and I was delighted to find a quilting cotton of a burnt gold pattern paisley.

Balancing the weight of different fabrics

The only issue was that the quilting cotton and the maroon curtain fabric are two very different weights. To solve this I doubled the quilting cotton.

In the photograph I have opened it up so you can see how it is simply two layers of the fabric. This evens up the weight of the fabric in the border.

Obviously I treated the double layer as if it was the same as a single layer and  other that that I used standard quilting techniques to create and attach the border. This is a subtext for lots of pins and lots ironing!

I pushed the ironing board against the table so that the table takes the weight of the quilt as I iron the border.

Once I was working with the quilt top I did change my mind about a inner border. Instead I decided a line of the paisley fabric running down each side of the quilt looked better. I liked the way these lines visually lengthened the quilt.

Once the border was on, I created the quilt sandwich.

I laid out the backing, the bamboo batting (which I have not used before but so far it is performing wonderfully) and the quilt top.  I used quilters pins to hold the quilt sandwich together. Because many of the fabrics will leave a pin mark I make sure the pins are used on the seam line.

I simply pin at regular intervals

Tying the quilt sandwich no stitches visible from the front

I then start the very long process of tying the quilt top to quilt back.

Tying the quilt together will stabilise and strengthen the quilt so although it is a long process I take time to do it well.

Since originally crazy quilts were not quilted I like to  have no stitches visible from the front of the quilt. How do I do this? I hide the stitches behind buttons and larger beads.

This is a stitch that comes from the back of the quilt, the thread travels through the bead, and I take the thread to the back of the quilt. In the process this hides that fact that the quilt is tied. I take the thread along to the next largish bead or button and repeat. I do this all over the quilt top.

This process means that often threads are taken an inch or two across the back of the quilt. This is quite messy so I hide all this work with a false back.  This looks messy but I hide all the mess behind a false back. The false back also adds strength but I will talk more about this next week if I am at that stage.

Well, I have quite a bit of this still to do so I had better get on with it!

 

Diamond block crazy quilt

Here is the finished quilt click on the image and you will taken to larger photo. I hope you enjoy seeing it.

The back story

If you are interested in the back story of this quilt and seeing photos of each block as it was made browse the posts  in the Diamond block crazy quilt category

Posts on How to assemble a Crazy Quilt which include;

Online Crazy Quilting Classes:

Just a quick reminder for those who are interested in taking a class with me. You will find all my classes listed under the top tab imaginatively titled Classes online you will also find information on how online classes are run.