2020 crazy quilt block 7

2020 crazy quilt block 7Please put on your imagination hats and then imagine me bounding into the room, with a big silly grin on my face waving my 2020 crazy quilt block 7 enthusiastically. It is great to be back home stitching, pulling out stuff for this challenge, making a mess and having fun. Yes, block 7 is now finished and bound.

The aim of the 2020 challenge, is to make a crazy quilt using 2,020 different items to mark the year 2020. You will find the guidelines, information, and a list of free resources here. I figure this is a leisurely and enjoyable project, as I have a couple of years to complete it. The fun is in finding and using 2020 different items.

2020 crazy quilt block 7 blank and nunstitchedThis was my starting point for block 7. I have started to share my unembellished blocks, as many people who start out get worried over the look of the block before they start stitching.  For me, it is often the embellishing that pulls a block together. I used 5 pieces of fabric and during the piecing process, I  added the braid/trim, the lace and the cut doily.

2020 crazy quilt block 7 patternAs usual, here is the basic pattern of my 2020 crazy quilt block 6, for those who want to use it. Before you ask, all my hexagons have 4-inch sides and measures 8 inches across from point-to-point but you can use this pattern for other sized hexagons too.

Details on my 2020 crazy quilt block 7

2020 crazy quilt block 7 detail 3The first photograph illustrates how I embellished the braid/trim with vintage sequins and bead scallops. Between the sequins, I placed a white vintage flower shaped novelty bead and I spaced a French Knot (counted on block 1) between the sequins.

2020 crazy quilt block 7 detail 2

The next detail is a version of chain stitch (version two on this page in my stitch dictionary). First, I worked the foundation row in a hand dyed cotton #5 perle thread then whipped it with a Threadworx thread called Pastel Sunset (I am not affiliated or get any kickback just thought it’s such a pretty thread people would want to know what it is) The butterflies are a vintage plastic button!

2020 crazy quilt block 7 detail 1This section is a little complex. As you can see I beaded the lace.  The strange alien flower motifs above the lace are made of Stem stitch (counted on block 1), Detached Chain Stitch (counted on block 1), both worked in a Caron watercolours thread (also not affiliated, nor do I gain financially). The little raised disk-shaped flowers are made of Cast on Stitch (counted on block 2) using one of my hand dyed cotton perle #8 threads. the little round disk-like daisy shape beads are plastic and pretty cheap as I found them in a discount store.

The rabbit button here is something I have hoarded for years as it was such a treat to have. It is a hand-painted mother-of-pearl button done by Gerry Krueger. Her hand-painted buttons are really the cutest things and simply gorgeous. She does have an Etsy store and writes a blog: Older Rose. Follow the link if you want to see her stuff and read her blog (also not affiliated just love her buttons! )

When I shared on Facebook a work in progress shot of this block I was asked about how I was keeping track of the number of things I had used so that the count was not muddled. I keep a studio journal and here you can see the page. I have scraps of the fabric and a piece of the braid/trim used on the block, bits of thread taped in as stitched and the card that Gerry’s button was on. It has her website so if ever I want that information it is there. You can see I also print out a photo of the block and glue it in when it’s done and keep a running tally of what is what.

Count on 2020 crazy quilt block 7

Seed and bugle beads are not counted.

  • Fabrics: 5
  • Lace braid/trim and doily: 3
  • Buttons 3: 1 hand painted  2 different coloured butterflies
  • Beads and sequins 4: vintage white flowers beads, round disk-shaped flower beads, pale glass face beads, vintage sequins.
  • Threads: 5  hand-dyed cotton perle #5, hand-dyed cotton perle #8, Threadworx Pastel Sunset, Caron Watercolour, pale yellow silk ribbon.
  • Stitches: 1 Whipped chain Version 2

Total 21
Previous tally 164

2020 crazy quilt block 7 bring the total of items used to date to 185!

I hope you have enjoyed reading about my 2020 crazy quilt block 7. The aim is to make a crazy quilt using 2020 different items by the end of the year 2020. If you want to find out more about the challenge. You will find the guidelines and list of resources here 

Have you seen my book?

holding my book in front of quilt

My book The Visual Guide to Crazy Quilting Design: Simple Stitches, Stunning Results detailed practical methods about how to design and make a crazy quilt. I cover everything from fabric choice, to balancing colour, texture and pattern, in order to balance and direct the eye around the block.  I reveal how to stitch, and build decorative seam treatments in interesting and creative ways. My book is profusely illustrated as my aim is to be practical and inspiring.

My Crazy quilters templates

My templates for crazy quilters are designed to help you take your stitching to the next level. With my templates, you are able to create hundreds of different hand embroidery patterns to embellish your seams with flair. These templates are easy to use, made of clear plastic so you can position them easily, and are compact in your sewing box.

using my Crazy Quilt Templates set 2These are simple to use. You simply position the template in place and use a quilter’s pencil to trace along the edge of the template. Stitch along this line to decorate the seam. I have a free ebook of patterns to accompany each set which illustrates how they can be used.

TO ORDER your Crazy Quilt Templates

Crazy Quilt Templates set 1 you will find here 
Crazy Quilt Templates set 2 you will find here 

Take a Stitch Tuesday 2018 Stitch 32

Buttonholed Herringbone 6
Stitch 32 is called Buttonholed Herringbone. I decided it was time for some fun, and this stitch is certainly that, as well as being surprisingly useful. Stitch 32 makes a border that is highly textured like a braid. It is literally a herringbone stitch that has been buttonholed, so check out the tutorial for Buttonholed Herringbone and have some fun with it.  If you work two rows facing each other, you have a line of circles and if you work two rows back to back they become diamonds.

Beyond TAST

Beyond TAST is for those readers who have done TAST before or for people who already know the basic embroidery stitches. Details about the current Beyond TAST challenge are here

TAST2012logo

How to take part in the Take a Stitch Tuesday challenge

If you are new to hand embroidery the challenge is to learn Stitch 32 and share what you have learnt. If you are an experienced embroiderer, enjoy the Beyond TAST challenge instead. Try and give your work a modern twist and share it online so beginners can see what can be done with a little imagination.

Where to share

Stitch a sample, photograph it, put in online on your blog, Flickr site, share it in the  TAST facebook group or where ever you hang out online. If you have a blog leave a comment on the Buttonholed Herringbone. page with your full web address so that people can visit your site and see what you have done.  Use #TASTembroidery and #PintangleTAST on places like Instagram etc.

If you need more information the challenge guidelines are on the TAST FAQ page.

 

Have you seen my Stitchers Templates?

Crazy quilt template set 2
As someone who loves crazy quilting and embroidery, I designed these templates with other stitchers in mind. With my templates, you can create hundreds of different patterns to apply to your stitching and crazy quilting projects. They are easy to use, totally clear so you can position them easily and they are compact in your sewing box.

Templates set 1 you will find here 
Templates set 2 you will find here 

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A visit to the Fashion Museum in Bath

Dresses in the Bath Fashion MuseumWhen we were in the UK we paid a visit to Bath. While we were there of course I had to see the world-class collection at the Fashion Museum. I must have spent a couple of hours wandering through the museum and ogling at everything from dresses, mens clothes, gloves, fans, belts, jewellery, shoes, buckles and bows!

Gloves in the Bath Fashion MuseumOf course I was interested in how garments were embellished and embroidered and spent a good part of the day enjoying the intricate and skilful work and fine crafting that went into making many of the garments.

There are almost 100,000 objects in the the Fashion Museum’s collection, so when it comes to selecting 100 prime pieces that can tell the story of fashion they do it well. The History of Fashion in 100 Objects celebrates fashion from the 1600s to today and boy did I enjoy it!

1610 waistcoat in the Bath Fashion MuseumThis 1610 waistcoat is embroidered in silk but for a lady in Shakespeare’s England it was considered informal attire!

Fans in the Bath Fashion MuseumOne aspect I really enjoyed is that descriptions are not just information about the garment shown, but social history was also included so you could contextualise the piece. For instance this display of fans and other items pointed out that in the 1800’s ivory was used for bags, fans, umbrellas and parasols. Today however many countries abide by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Fauna. There is still an illegal trade in ivory but conventions such as this has helped to reduce the use.

Booties 1800 in the Bath Fashion MuseumThere was quite a bit of information on techniques too. For instanace these babies booties from the 1800’s were quilted.

Chiffon Gown in the Bath Fashion MuseumI also enjoyed the Royal fashion section and loved the Queen Alexandra’s gowns, she had excellent taste and obviously loved fashion. This embroidered and beaded mauve silk chiffon dress, from 1911 really captured my heart.

The collection is displayed in low light, to protect the fabrics. This meant photography is difficult particularly since I was using my phone to take these photos. Hopefully my images are not too dull. If you visit the Fashion Museum website you can see more photographed professionally

Also, in my research into the Fashion Museum in Bath I dug up a few videos which I think readers will enjoy. Both are only a few minutes long. Make a cuppa and enjoy them!

The first, A Day in the Life of the Fashion Museum and Assembly Rooms give you a sense of the place and is a behind the scenes view of life at the Fashion Museum.

Here is a tour of the Fashion Museum with Manager Rosemary Harden.

 

holding my book in front of quiltHave you seen my book?

My book The Visual Guide to Crazy Quilting Design: Simple Stitches, Stunning Results  shares practical methods about how to design and make a crazy quilt. I teach you how to balance colour, texture and pattern, in order direct the viewers eye around a crazy quilted project. I show you how to build decorative seam treatments in interesting and creative ways using a handful of stitches. My book is profusely illustrated as my aim is to be both practical and inspiring.

Take a Stitch Tuesday 2018 Stitch 31

Stitch 31 TAST2012logo for Take a Stitch Tuesday 2018 is Vandyke Stitch which is one of those useful hand embroidery stitches that is traditionally used as a border stitch – but you can use it in other ways. Vandyke Stitch is very versatile. For instance, if you like working floral motifs, by varying the width you can create nice leaf shapes that have a central line up the spine of the design.  One way I use it is to vary the length of the arms – you can create interesting waving lines and shapes very easily. I have also used it to couch down novelty threads using just one side of the stitch to secure the novelty yarn. You can also build it up, row upon row as a filler stitch.

I hope you enjoy stitch 31. You will find a tutorial for Vandyke stitch here

Beyond TAST

Beyond TAST is for those readers who have done TAST before or for people who already know the basic embroidery stitches. Details about the current Beyond TAST challenge are here

How to take part in the Take a Stitch Tuesday challenge

If you are new to hand embroidery the challenge is to learn how to do Vandyke Stitch  and share what you have learnt. If you are an experienced embroiderer enjoy the Beyond TAST challenge instead. Try and give your work a modern twist and share it online so beginners can see what can be done with a little imagination.

Where to share

Stitch a sample, photograph it, put in online on your blog, Flickr site, share it in the  TAST facebook group or where ever you hang out online. If you have a blog leave a comment on the Vandyke Stitch page with your full web address so that people can visit your site and see what you have done.

If you need more information the challenge guidelines are on the TAST FAQ page.

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