Twisted Satin Stitch with and without a bead tutorial

Twisted Satin Stitch, with and without a bead are two delightfully simple yet versatile stitches. Both can be sprinkled across an area or arranged in patterns to create fills. Worked in a radial arrangement it creates small flower like motifs. You can work Twisted Satin Stitch in a line with the stitches pointing end or work them side by side to build up a band.

Twisted Satin stitch and Twisted satin stitch with a bead. Both samples are worked using perle 8 thread.

How to work Twisted satin stitch

Twisted Satin Stitch step 1Bring your needle through to the front of the fabric.
Take a small bite of the fabric as if you were going to make a small straight stitch. Then bring the needle with the point emerging at the base of the straight stitch.
Twisted Satin Stitch step 2Pull the needle through so that it emerges at the base of the stitch you have just made.

Twisted Satin Stitch step 3Thread the needle under the straight stitch. Make sure you go under the thread only not through the fabric.
Pull the needle through under the stitch.

Twisted Satin Stitch step 4Take the needle back through the fabric at the top of the first stitch.

Twisted Satin Stitch step 5As you can see it can be arranged in different directions.

How to work Twisted Satin Stitch with a bead.

As a tip use a size 26 tapestry needle as the needle is thin enough to thread the bead on yet the eye is wide enough to thread a #8 or #5 perle thread.

Twisted Satin Stitch with bead 1Twisted satin stitch with a bead starts the same way as Twisted satin. Work steps 1 and 2.
On the third step before you thread the needle under the straight stitch thread a bead on to your thread.

Twisted Satin Stitch with bead 2Thread the needle under the straight stitch as you would in standard twisted satin stitch. Make sure you go under the thread only not through the fabric. Pull the needle through under the stitch.

Twisted Satin Stitch with bead 3These too can be arranged in patterns or sprinkled across an area. If you are making Christmas/holiday  decorations this beaded version is a great way to sprinkle sparkle over a shape. It is quick and easy to do and if the thread you use is metallic it is very effective.

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Beaded Hedebo Edge Stitch Tutorial

I am sure crazy quilters will love Beaded Hedebo Edge as it is  decorative and pretty. I know that it has become one of my favourites. Apart from being used as an edging stitch, this stitch has loads of creative potential, I like it particularly worked along the edge of paisley patterns.

Beaded Hedebo Edge stitch sample I discovered the stitch  in the A-Z of Embroidery Stitches 2 which is part of the Country Bumpkin series of A-Z Needlecraft books (The same people who produce Inspirations Magazines) .

It is called Beaded Hedebo Edge and consists of a foundation row of cross stitches which are then worked over in beads and scalloped with a form of buttonhole.

For purposes of this sample I used 3m beads, tapestry needle size 26 and perle 8 thread.

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 1You may want to take a look at up and down buttonhole stitch because the the second part of working up and down buttonhole is the same hand movement as the  stitch on Beaded Hedebo Edge.

How to work Beaded Hedebo Edge

First make a line of half cross stitches almost as if you were working alternating cross stitch but make every second stitch longer.

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 2Make the return run to complete the cross stitches.

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 3Bring the needle to the front at ‘A’ and thread a seed bead on your needle.

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 4Take it back into the fabric at ‘B’

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 5Your bead will sit at an angle as illustrated.

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 6Bring your needle out of the fabric at ‘C’

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 7Pass your needle upwards under both bars of the cross stitch but NOT through the fabric.

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 8Wrap the thread behind the needle as illustrated.

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 9Pull the needle through in an upwards motion. Half way along the length of the thread change direction and move your hand downwards. This means you are stitching in an up and over motion.

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 10As you tighten the thread slightly a loop is made at the bottom of the bar.

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 11Pull until snug.

NOTE: Your are not stitching through the fabric

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 12Continue along the cross bars until the bars are snug, packed with stitches. Take your needle to the back at the base of the bar to keep the edge neat.

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 13Bring your needle out at the base of the small cross stitch, take up a bead thread it on your needle. Take your needle to the back at the top of the stitch.

Bring your needle out at the base of the long cross stitch ready to repeat the process again.

step by step Beaded Hedebo Edge 14Continue in this manner until you have worked all the bars.
I hope you enjoy the stitch!

Crazy quilt template set 2 Have you seen my Stitchers Templates?

As someone who loves crazy quilting and embroidery I designed these templates with other stitchers in mind. With my templates you can create hundreds of different patterns to apply to your stitching and crazy quilting projects. They are easy to use, totally clear so you can position them easily and they are compact in your sewing box.

Templates set 1 you will find here 
Templates set 2 you will find here 
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From Studio Journal Design to Embroidery: A hand embroidered file cover part 1

This is the first in a series of articles illustrating the development of my hand embroidered file cover from its start in my studio journal to its design, and then sharing how I stitched the design and the design decisions made along the way. The project is a hand embroidered file cover for my stitchers worksheets.

 

Hand embroidered File cover design in journal 1The source of the design

The idea for this project started because at the end of our street, we have a green belt that is being re-planted after the bush fires that hit Canberra in 2003. I had thought I might explore working a few little pieces associated with that area of land as it had seen some dramatic changes. The topic of the fires, the environment, global warming, the devastation, then the regrowth and the changes associated with the Canberra fires is large enough to be a series of works. I was not sure I wanted to work a huge series of works but was exploring ideas in my studio journal. I decided I wanted to take it a step further and use my needle to apply the ideas in fabric and thread. Rather than launch into a series of full wall pieces I decided I would first work a sample that could become a file cover. It was a way of testing some of the the ideas I had without commiting to a huge long process of a big work.

Hand embroidered File cover design in journal
I started exploring imagery and patterns drawing summer grasses but after a long period of faffing about with these (not shown) I decided summer grasses did not really catch the mood of what I was thinking about. The fires were not mere little grass fires. They were  forests ablaze  that whipped up such heat they became a firestorm ripping through the suburbs taking nearly 500 homes with it. I decided to focus on a few remaining trees that survived the fires. These are gum trees. At first I had an aversion to using such a cliche of an Australian gum leaf but the more I played with it the more I felt they spoke of Australian summers, heat and in this case survival.
I started with just a few individual leaves then after working about 20 designs the leaf shapes moved together producing the page above. When I saw it I decided that would be the pattern.  I liked the composition so decided to use it.

Hand embroidered File cover design in journal thread and bead choice
I traced the page to produce a line drawing that I could use as a pattern. Next I sorted out the colour scheme and threads. I chose chunky threads as I did not want delicate stitching.  I did choose some cotton perle #5 and #8 but I also chose linen and cotton abroder threads which are dull. They do not have a sheen. I wanted earthy summer colours that felt natural, not threads that had a high sheen to them as they felt too decorative.

I then chose beads that were made of wood and shell. They were unpolished and in some cases a bit rough as once again I wanted a natural feel to the piece. I then scaled up the drawing so it would be the right size for a file cover. I used a window as light box to transfer the design to fabric ( a tutorial on how to do this is here)  and started to stitch.

Hand embroidered File cover design startedThe fabric I chose is a 26 count linen that is a jute fawn type of colour which will sit well the natural theme of the design which is of gum leaves. The colour is nicer in life than in the photograph.

As you can see I have started to stitch. The top left and bottom right hand areas are stitched using Satin stitch, Padded Satin Stitch. The fine lines you can see are made with Back Stitch, and Running Stitch. I have started to outline the top leaf in Stem Stitch and bottom leaf is outlined in a heavier linear stitch, whipped chain stitch. The textured surface stitches I am using are Bullion knots, French knots, Buttonhole wheels, Buttonhole Wheel Cups and Cast-on stitch. All of these stitches you can find in my Stitch Dictionary.

hand embroidered file cover part 4
Click on the image to see a large version of the finished project.
From Studio Journal Design to Embroidery posts in the series are.

 

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Crazy quilt template set 2

Have you seen my Stitchers templates?

As a stitcher who loves crazy quilting and embroidery I designed these templates with other stitchers in mind. With my Stitchers Templates you can create hundreds of different patterns to embroider on your stitching and crazy quilting projects. They are easy to use, totally clear so you can position them easily and they are compact in your sewing box.

Templates set 1 you will find here 
Templates set 2 you will find here