Beaded Lock stitch Tutorial

Beaded Lock stitch step sampleBeaded Lock stitch is a  variation on double lock stitch. It is a very quick and easy to work beaded embroidery stitch, that looks good as a border or worked row upon row for a filling stitch.

You need to be familiar with lock stitch to work this variety.

The samples are worked in straight line but this stitch will hold a curve if you adjust the angle the foundation stitches in a ray or fan like manner.

Note: With this stitch the beading is done during the lacing process using a size 26 tapestry needle as you can thread cotton perle #8 and #5 through the eye of this needle yet it is thin enough to thread a bead and add it  to your stitching.

How to work Beaded Lock Stitch

Beaded Lock stitch step 1Work a row of straight stitches of equal length.

The lacing is worked from right to left. Bring your thread out on the right side of the first straight stitch.
Pass the thread the needle under the first stitch from the left with the tip pointing right (as illustrated).Pull the needle under the straight stitch.

Add a bead to your working thread.

Beaded Lock stitch step 2

Move to the next straight stitch and pass the needle under from the left with the tip pointing towards the right. Pull the thread through. This will lace together the first two foundation stitches with a bead in the middle. Note that you are lacing the stitches and not going through the fabric.

Continue in this manner along the line of foundation stitches. At the end of the line take your thread to the back of your work.

Beaded Lock stitch step 3Turn your work.

Beaded Lock stitch step 4Work a second line of laced stitches adding beads in between every second foundation stitch as illustrated.

On this top line you can offset the beads to create a stepped pattern or you can align the beads to form a vertical ridge.

Beaded Lock stitch step 5Both worked row upon row create a highly decorative and quick filling stitch.




Lock and Double Lock Stitch Tutorial

Lock Stitch looks simple but is amazingly versatile. There is also a double version. Both are very quick and easy to stitch, look good in range of threads, will follow a curve or worked row up on row make a wonderful filling stitch.
All that, and (don’t worry I am not going to offer you set of knives) there is the obvious use for borders or as an edging stitch. Also because this is a lacing stitch the lacing thread can be a larger novelty thread which can create some interesting effects.

How to work Lock Stitch

Lock stitch basically consists of a row of vertical straight stitches that are laced.
Use a tapestry needle to avoid splitting the foundation stitches

Lock stitch step 1Work a row of straight stitches of equal length

Lock stitch step 2The lacing is worked from right to left. Bring your thread out on the right side of the first straight stitch.
Pass the thread the needle under the first stitch from the left with the tip pointing right (as illustrated).Pull the needle under the straight stitch.

Lock stitch step 3Move to the next straight stitch and pass the needle under from the left with the tip pointing towards the right. Pull the thread through. This will lace together the first two foundation stitches.Note that you are lacing the stitches and not going through the fabric.

Lock stitch step 4Continue in this manner along the line of foundation stitches. At the end of the line take your thread to the back of your work.

Lock stitch step 5How to work Double lock stitch

Double lock stitch is simply a line of lacing along the bottom of the foundation stitches and then a line along the top.

lockstitch-6-double
Double lock worked row upon row creates a very interesting and quick filling stitch.




How to Hand Embroider Closed Herringbone Stitch

Closed herringbone is a variety of herringbone where the stitch is worked so closely together that it forms a line of crossed stitches. On the back of the fabric it will show a two lines of back stitches so it is also known as Double Backstitch. Another use for this stitch is to work it on sheer or semi sheer fabric to create a style of very subtle and interesting type of embroidery called shadow work.

Normally with forms of herringbone stitch you would work the crosses on the front of the embroidery as a surface stitch but in shadow work you work the stitch on the back and it shows through the fabric. This means the shadow of the work is seen hence the name. When worked in shadow work Closed Herringbone is known as Shadow stitch.

But  you can also use closed herringbone as surface stitch too. It is very useful to define a good strong line or in a border or as part of an edging.

How to hand embroider Closed Herringbone stitch

Closed Herringbone Stitch step 1
This stitch is worked from left to right between two lines. Commence by bringing the needle out on the bottom left-hand side of the line to be worked.

Take the needle up and make a small stitch on the upper line which points to the left, pull the thread through.

Insert the needle on the lower line but have the needle tip emerge  in line with the edge of the edge of the upper stitch (as illustrated) and make a small stitch which points to the left.

Closed Herringbone Stitch step 2Insert the needle on the upper line a little to the right and make a small stitch which points to the left. Have the needle emerge next to the previous stitch. Continue in the manner along the line working each herringbone stitch closely so that is sits right next to the previous stitch.

Closed Herringbone Stitch

I hope you enjoy the stitch

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