Take a Stitch Tuesday 108 Rice stitch and varieties 109 Square Boss

Rice stitch detailWhen I shared this little detail from my sampler I was asked to include this stitch in TAST. I said I would. It has taken me a month to get to it but here it is, another thing crossed off my stitching to do list! I also have a question for my readers towards the end of the article. I would love to hear your comments  about it.

Sampler detail 158This week the stitch is Rice Stitch and two varieties and a variation called Boss Stitch. This stitch is also known as crossed corners and William and Mary stitch. This is thought of as a canvas stitch, but as you can see it can be worked on aida or linen too. If you want to use it on another type of fabric you can use waste canvas.

Sampler detail 164
At first glance it looks a little boring but it is tremendously versatile. It is known as a canvas stitch background because it can be easily worked and builds up quickly.
Don’t let the fact that it is and canvas stitch put you off however because many of the canvas stitches can be worked on Aida (like the samples illustrated) or any even weave fabric with great effect. If you want to work it on other fabric or over an area of crazy patchwork use Waste Canvas.

How to work Rice Stitch

This is an illustrated step by step on how you work Rice stitch. As you can see it is very simple consisting of a cross stitch foundation with a second layer of diagonal stitches added to each arm of the cross.

Rice stitch illustrated stepsHow to work Variety 1 and 2 of Rice Stitch

I want to share 2 varieties (there are a lot more) As you can see they all have the same structure

Rice stitch V1 illustrated stepsThe first variety is a cross worked over more threads so that the diagonal stitches sit apart slightly.

Rice stitch V2 illustrated stepsThe next variety has 3 diagonal stitches worked across each bar.

Rice stitch sample 2You can really have fun with this stitch particularly if you change threads. You can use one thread or colour for the large cross and another thread of colour for the corner tie downs. Swap between thick and thin, metallic and dull or explore colour combinations. Change the size of your stitches and you can always add beads or French knots to really give the stitch a contrast of texture. It is one of those simple stitches that can produce interesting results.

Rice stitch sample 1??Square Boss Stitch
Square Boss stitch is also known as raised knot stitch. Don’t ask me why as I don’t know. However it is so similar to Rice stitch I have decided to group these two stitches together as many of the experiments you can do with Rice stitch you can also do with Square Boss.

Square Boss Rice stitch illustrated stepsSquare boss starts with a larger cross stitch and the tie stitches are tucked further to the crossed threads in the middle. This means that the pattern established varies from Rice stitch but it is really a variety.

I hope you enjoy experimenting with both these stitches.

I have a question.
Would readers like to see more of the canvas stitches included in TAST? I would still have the surface stitches as I still have lots to share. I also have the silk ribbon stitches, Beaded stitches and pulled and drawn thread stitches I could add. What would people enjoy? A mix of stitches or an emphasis on some styles? This year playing with the beaded stitches has made it more interesting for me, but what about you? If you like the canvas stitches is it better to see them worked in steps in thread, the way I have done or is the traditional diagramming better understood. Another thing I have been wondering about is, when we have varieties like this do readers want more time between the publication of stitches so they can “Keep up”?

I would really like to hear from readers. It does not matter if you stitch every week, pick a stitch occasionally or simply read every week. I would love to hear peoples ideas. Leave a comment as to what you like.

Like it? Join in!

Once you have worked a sample,  photograph it and put it online at your blog, flickr etc then swing back to the Last TAST post (you will find it under the category each week)  and leave a comment. If you are pushed for time and don’t get a chance to do it this week, don’t fret as next week I will also open a post so people can leave their details.

If you want to share the technique with friends do so but please link toPintangle.com

You can also share your explorations on the  Facebook TAST group, and the flickr TAST site. All these sub groups are set up at request of members

Don’t want to miss our on any of the TAST stitches this year?

Subscribe to Pin Tangle by Email and have it delivered to your In Box. Follow the link to sign up. You do NOT have to be stitching along to take advantage of this service.


Break week for TAST stitches

Last week I posted instructions for 2 stitches.  People drop away when there is too many stitches and they feel they can’t keep up so as promised this week is time to catch up. I don’t want TAST to become a  to do list but rather I hope my readers can use it as than a space for experimentation and creative skill development.

I am opening up this page so that if you have worked a sample from  ANY of the stitches listed on the TAST FAQ page  post a comment below and tell us about it.

Once you have worked a sample,  photograph it and put it online at your blog, flickr etc then swing back to the Last TAST post (you will find it under the category each week)  and leave a comment.

Don’t want to miss our on any of the TAST stitches?

Subscribe to Pin Tangle by Email and have it delivered to your In Box. Follow the link to sign up. You do NOT have to be stitching along to take advantage of this service.
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Stitches 106 and 107 Looped Cretan and Beaded Looped Cretan

Beaded Looped Cretan stitch sampleThis week I have 2 stitches to share. The first is an interesting version of Cretan stitch that I discovered in an old embroidery book by Edith John titled Creative Stitches.

It is called Looped Cretan and the second stitch this week is my adaption which includes adding a bead. It is really useful to know the foundation stitch which is of course Cretan stitch. Both samples are worked using a cotton perle #5 thread. Once again in the beaded version the beading is not done afterwards but during the stitching process.

Tip! Use a size 26 tapestry needle. Since the eye of a tapestry needle is long you can thread perle #8 and perle #5 through the long eye. However the needle itself is thin which means you can add a bead to your working thread as you stitch.  This choice of needle is key to success with this type of beaded embroidery.

How to work Looped Cretan Stitch 

Work from top to bottom between 2 imaginary lines.

Looped Cretan stitch 1Bring the needle through the fabric at the start of the line on the top left side. Move across the line and insert your needle on the right edge. With your needle angled and pointing towards the center of the line make a small stitch.

Looped Cretan stitch 2Keeping the thread under the needle as illustrated pull it through your fabric. It should look like a shallow unsecured fly stitch.

Looped Cretan stitch 3Insert your needle on the right edge in the same place, as illustrated. Angle your needle downward as illustrated and make a small stitch.

Looped Cretan stitch 4Keeping the thread under the needle as illustrated pull it through your fabric to create a loop. This loop is like adding one buttonhole stitch. It is also this extra loop on the Cretan stitch that gives this stitch its name.

Looped Cretan stitch 5Move across the line and insert your needle on the left edge. With your needle angled as illustrated and pointing towards the center of the line, make a small stitch. (As you would for regular Cretan stitch)

Looped Cretan stitch 6Keeping the thread under the needle as illustrated pull it through your fabric.

Looped Cretan stitch 7Insert your needle on the left edge in the same place, as illustrated. Angle your needle downward and pointing towards the center of the line make a small stitch.   Keeping the thread under the needle as illustrated pull it through your fabric to create a loop.

Looped Cretan stitch 8

Looped Cretan stitch 9Move across to the right and repeat this process. Continue working downward, back and forth until the line is worked.

As you can see this is a decorative and interesting stitch  and would be useful working in trailing lines as part of a floral motif.

Like Cretan you can work Looped Cretan stitch close together to form a very different patten in the movement of the stitch. You can vary the length of the wings or the angle of the wings to creat interesting effects. You can increase the width of the wing , then return to the established line  to created an alternating pattern of wider wings.

You can work this Looped Cretan stitch in a circle to create other organic like forms.

It is very verstaile and I hope readers enjoy experimenting with it.

How to work Beaded Looped Cretan Stitch 

You work this stitch using the same method as Looped Cretan stitch but add a bead to your working thread. I have added a bead after each loop is created but you can add beads at any of the steps and each creates a different pattern.

Use a size 26 tapestry needle as this type of needle is thin enough to take the bead yet the ye is large enough to take perle #8 or perle #5 thread.

Beaded Looped Cretan stitch  1Work from top to bottom between 2 imaginary lines.

Bring the needle through the fabric at the start of the line on the top left side. Move across the line and insert your needle on the right edge. With your needle angled and pointing towards the center of the line make a small stitch.  Keeping the thread under the needle as illustrated pull it through your fabric.

Beaded Looped Cretan stitch  2

Insert your needle on the right edge in the same place, as you did at the first step, as illustrated. Angle your needle downward as illustrated and make a small stitch.   Keeping the thread under the needle as illustrated pull it through your fabric to create a loop.

Beaded Looped Cretan stitch 3Add a bead to your work thread and tuck it up against the last stitch.

Beaded Looped Cretan stitch 4Move across the line and insert your needle on the left edge. With your needle angled as illustrated and pointing towards the center of the line make a small stitch.  Keeping the thread under the needle pull it through your fabric.

Beaded Looped Cretan stitch 5Insert your needle on the left edge in the same place, as illustrated. Angle your needle downward and pointing towards the center of the line make a small stitch.

Beaded Looped Cretan stitch 6Keeping the thread under the needle as illustrated pull it through your fabric to create a loop.

Beaded Looped Cretan stitch 7Add a bead to your work thread and tuck it up against the last stitch.

Beaded Looped Cretan stitch 8Move across to the right and repeat this process. Continue working downward, back and forth until the line is worked.

Like it? Join in!

Once you have worked a sample,  photograph it and put it online at your blog, flickr etc then swing back to the Last TAST post (you will find it under the category each week)  and leave a comment. If you are pushed for time and don’t get a chance to do it this week, don’t fret as next week I will also open a post so people can leave their details.

If you want to share the technique with friends do so but please link to Pintangle.com

You can also share your explorations on the  Facebook TAST group, and the flickr TAST site. All these sub groups are set up at request of members

Don’t want to miss our on any of the TAST stitches this year?

Subscribe to Pin Tangle by Email and have it delivered to your In Box. Follow the link to sign up. You do NOT have to be stitching along to take advantage of this service.


TAST break week

Since last week I posted instructions for 2 stitches this week is  a break week so people can catch up.  I have found people drop away when there is too many stitches and they feel they can’t keep up. The thing turns into a huge to do list rather than a space for experimentation and creative skill development.

I am opening up this page so that if you have worked a sample from  ANY of the stitches listed on the TAST FAQ page  post a comment below and tell us about it.

Once you have worked a sample,  photograph it and put it online at your blog, flickr etc then swing back to the Last TAST post (you will find it under the category each week)  and leave a comment.

Don’t want to miss our on any of the TAST stitches?

Subscribe to Pin Tangle by Email and have it delivered to your In Box. Follow the link to sign up. You do NOT have to be stitching along to take advantage of this service.