How to Embroider Beaded Back Stitch

Back stitch beaded is a line of back stitch that is simple and quick to work as you add a bead to every second stitch. It makes sense that you need to know how to work regular back stitch before embarking on the beaded variety. You can find instructions on how to work Back stitch here on Pintangle.

The trick with hand embroidered beaded stitches is to use a #26 tapestry needle. This size needle is fine enough to thread a bead, yet the eye is wide enough to take a perle # 8 thread. This means you can embroider and add beads easily as you work.

How to embroider beaded back stitch

In Beaded Back Stitch every second stitch beaded.

Step by step beaded back stitch tutorial 1 Bring the thread up from the back of the fabric on the line that you want to embroider. Make a small backward stitch through the fabric as you would regular back stitch. Bring the needle through the fabric a little in front of the first stitch but still on the line.

Step by step beaded back stitch tutorial 2Thread a bead and make the second stitch by inserting the needle down into the hole made by the first stitch.

Step by step beaded back stitch tutorial 3Take a bite of the fabric, bringing the needle out a little in front of the second stitch as illustrated. Pull your thread through.

Step by step beaded back stitch tutorial 4Make the next stitch a regular back stitch. When you bring your needle through the fabric thread another bead on. Repeat this pattern of beaded stitch , un-beaded stitch, beaded stitch, un-beaded stitch along the line.

Step by step beaded back stitch tutorial 5The finished line is very decorative. Beaded Back stitch  makes a good edging stitch for items such as needle cases or pin cushions. Of course it is ideal for contemporary crazy quilting too!

Step by step beaded back stitch tutorial 6As I have said this example of Beaded Back Stitch is where every second stitch beaded but the pattern of one back stitch and one beaded back stitch can be changed to create interesting patterns and designs. For example you could have two back stitches and one bead or 3 back stitches and 1 bead or 2 beads and back stitch I am sure you get the idea. Patterns can be worked line upon line – such as in pattern darning, to create many interesting beaded embroidery variations.


How to embroider Alternating Barred Chain Stitch

Alternating Barred chain stitch sample 4Alternating Barred Chain stitch is one of those interesting textured stitches that you may want to add to your hand embroidery repertoire of stitches. It is an interesting member of the chain stitch family that produces a  textured line.  I think that Alternating Barred Chain stitch is in some ways more interesting than its sister Barred chain as I like the pattern and swing that is set up by the alternating arms of this stitch. This swing can create movement in a piece.

Alternating Barred Chain can be worked easily and quickly and looks great in chunky textured novelty threads. This stitch follows a curve well and is great for creating designs with an organic feel. You can use it to represent a thorny vine or in underwater scenes representing seaweed and marine plants.

 

Alternating Barred chain stitch sample 3

How to work Alternating Barred Chain Stitch

Work from top to bottom. Start with a basic chain stitch.

step by step barred chain stitch 1Insert the needle to the left of the chain with the tip emerging a short space down the line.

step by step Alternating Barred chain stitch1The gap can vary, depending upon how wide you want the ‘spike’ of the chain. The wider the gap the larger the spike.

step by step Alternating Barred chain stitch 2Wrap the thread under the needle point, towards the right as illustrated and pull the needle through the fabric.The thread will cross as you do this, producing a crossed stitch as illustrated.

step by step Alternating Barred chain stitch 3The second stitch is a basic chain stitch.

step by step Alternating Barred chain stitch 4Insert the needle to the right of the chain with the tip emerging a short space down the line. Wrap the thread under the needle point, towards the left as illustrated and pull the needle through the fabric.

step by step Alternating Barred chain stitch 5Repeat this pattern of single chain and barred chain angled left, followed by a single chain, then a barred chain angled right.

Alternating Barred chain stitch sample 1Alternating Barred chain produces interesting  hard wearing bands if you work it row upon row.

Alternating Barred chain stitch sample 2Or you can set up a pattern by working two rows back to back and arranging the spines in a regular manner.

Alternating Barred chain stitch sample 5You can change the number of stitches you work on each side too. Of course this creates another variety. Alternating Barred chain is also an ideal stitch to use in crazy quilting!

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How to work Back Stitch

Back stitch sampleBack stitch is often used along side cross stitch to define a clean neat line in a design. It is classified as a linear stitch because you can create lines with it! Back stitch is an old adaptable stitch which can be used as a delicate outline or as a foundation in composite stitches, such as Pekinese stitch. It is also a great stitch to whip or thread with a heavier yarn. You can add beads to it too!

Back stitch sample using hand dyed threadIf you want to work blackwork patterns using hand dyed or variegated threads use back stitch. Many blackwork patterns can be very effective worked this way and the changing colours  add a contemporary touch to a traditional style of hand embroidery.

Back stitch sample on contemporary hand embroideryThis is a stitch that is considered a basic stitch as it is always introduced to beginners, but I feel  people underestimate  its versatility which ensures its timeless appeal to generations of stitchers. For instance in this sample (click to see a larger version)  I have used back stitch to define the lines of the sand. Set against the highly textured embroidery the simple ‘basic’ stitch creates the contrast I wanted.

Back stitch step by step tutorialIf needed, mark your line with a quilters pencil or soluble pen or pencil. Bring the thread up from the back of the fabric on the line that you want to create. Make a small backward stitch through the fabric.

Bring the needle through the fabric a little in front of the first stitch and still on the line. Pull the thread through the fabric.

Make the second stitch backward,inserting the needle down into the hole made by the first stitch and bringing the needle out a little in front of the second stitch but still on the line. Repeat this movement and continue sewing in such a manner along the line.

Back stitch is also known as point de sable

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