From Studio Journal Design to Embroidery: A hand embroidered file cover part 3

From Studio Journal Design to Embroidery: A hand embroidered file cover part 3

This is the last in a series of articles about designing a hand embroidery project. It moves from creating the design to working the finished project. Links to previous articles are the bottom of the page.

hand embroidered file cover part 3 on frameUp until this stage I had been working on hoop and moving the hoop around. Eventually I get to the stage where I can not reposition the hoop without squashing stitches. It gets worse if I start adding beads. At this point in the process I usually stretch the embroidery frame. I dont really like frames, so I put it off as long as possible but as the pieces becomes heavier with the stitches and beads keeping an even tension is harder.

hand embroidered file cover part 3 detailAt this stage I concentrate on filling in the negative space areas with highly textured stitches. The areas are encrusted which is why I call it encrusted embroidery. The textured surface stitches I am using are Bullion Knots, French Knots, Buttonhole wheels, Buttonhole Wheel Cups, Whipped Wheels and Cast-on stitch. All of these stitches you can find in my Stitch Dictionary.

hand embroidered file cover part 4
Click on the image to see a large version of the finished project.
From Studio Journal Design to Embroidery posts in the series are.

 

 

 

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Thread Twisties!


Experimenting with different threads can be expensive. You would normally have to buy a whole skein of each type of thread. So I have made up my thread twisties which are a combination of different threads to use in creative hand embroidery. These enable you to try out stitching with something other than stranded cotton. For the price of just a few skeins, you can experiment with a bundle of threads of luscious colours and many different textures.

These are creative embroiders threads. With them, I hope to encourage you to experiment. Each Twistie is a thread bundle containing silk, cotton, rayon, and wool. Threads range from extra fine (the same thickness as 1 strand of embroidery floss) to chunky couchable textured yarns. All threads have a soft and manageable drape so twisting them around a needle makes experimental hand embroidery an interesting journey rather than a battle.  Many are hand-dyed by me. And they are all threads I use. You may find a similar thread twist but no two are identical.

You will find my thread twisties in the Pintangle shop here.

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7 Comments

  1. Hi Chris the stitches you list are all there so I have used buttonhole wheels, buttonhole wheel cups and part cups, detached chain, drizzle, cast on stitch, bullions, French knots, and beads worked on a linen background. You ask what have you missed – well not alot but the last 3 Wednesdays I have blogged about it.

    The pictures are large and probably your screen is small. The software only offers a larger image not scroll bar options I am afraid. Thanks for letting me know as I was not aware of this.

    Sharon B
  2. This is fabulous, Sharon. What stitches are you using? It looks like buttonhole wheels, bullions, drizzle stitch and various types of beads. What have I missed? I am talking about the 'spotty' areas not the long lines.

    Also I am having problems looking at the enlarged versions of your photos. For some reason when I get the bigger picture on my screen, I can't scroll up or down so I only get to see the top half. Can you help please?

    Chris
  3. Such glorious Australian colours in this Sharon. The stitching as always is second to none. I'm enjoying seeing this progress. Will be back in the AM to see close-up shots, more download then. Cheers, and happy stitching.

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