Take a Stitch Tuesday 2018 Stitch 7

Stitch 7 for Take a Stitch Tuesday 2018, is to learn or experiment with feather stitch. Follow the link for instructions and eye candy.

Stitch 7 Feather stitch sample
For those who are new to embroidery, you will find that aspects of the hand movements you need to make this stitch are similar to those learnt in Fly stitch and Buttonhole. I hope you can see there is a method to my madness in introducing these stitches in this way, as each builds a little on the skill gained while learning the previous stitch. In fact, the first 15-20 weeks or so of TAST is effectively an embroidery course suitable for beginners to take.

Beyond TAST

For those who have done TAST before or if you already know the basic embroidery stitches join in on the Beyond TAST challenge. Beyond TAST is a season of 4-6 weeks that allows time to explore an aspect of a design, technique, style, or family of stitches. See the TAST FAQ for more details. The current Beyond TAST challenge was announced last week so follow the link and enjoy that.

TAST2012logo

How to take part in the Take a Stitch Tuesday challenge

If you are new to hand embroidery the challenge is to learn the stitches. Learn stitch 7 and share what you have learnt. If you are an experienced embroiderer enjoy the Beyond TAST challenge instead. Try and give your work a modern twist and share it online so beginners can see what can be done with a little imagination.

Where to share

Stitch a sample of stitch 7, photograph it, put in online on your blog, Flickr site, share it in the  TAST facebook group or where ever you hang out online. If you have a blog leave a comment on feather stitch page with your full web address so that people can visit your site and see what you have done.  For Flickr people, the group is Take a Stitch Tuesday. Hashtags are #TASTembroidery and #PintangleTAST on places like Instagram etc.

If you need more information the challenge guidelines are on the TAST FAQ page.

Crazy quilt template set 2 Have you seen my Stitchers Templates?

As someone who loves crazy quilting and embroidery, I designed these templates with other stitchers in mind. With my templates, you can create hundreds of different patterns to apply to your stitching and crazy quilting projects. They are easy to use, totally clear so you can position them easily and they are compact in your sewing box.

Templates set 1 you will find here 
Templates set 2 you will find here 

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You can have Pintangle delivered to your inbox by using the ‘follow’ feature in the sidebar. Just enter your email address, and when you get the confirmation email make sure you say yes and you are all set! If you are on a mobile or tablet you will need to scroll to the bottom to find the ‘follow’ feature.



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Take a Stitch Tuesday 2018 Stitch 6

chain stitch sample 1Stitch 6 for Take a Stitch Tuesday 2018 is Chain stitch. This tremendously useful stitch is quick and easy to do. Chain stitch is a foundation stitch for a whole family of looped stitches. The trick with all chain stitches is to not pull the stitch too tight, as a tight tension will pull the loop of the stitch tighter causing a puckered line.

Chain stitch will hold a curve well and is ideal to use to outline a pattern or for lettering. The sample above is a sample worked in cotton perle #5 thread

chain stitch sample 2

This sample is worked in a fine knitting yarn that has a metallic blended thread in it. It is worked on 26 count linen.

Time for another Beyond TAST Challenge!

For those who have done TAST before, or if you already know the basic embroidery stitches, the next challenge is to explore isolated stitches. There are plenty of isolated stitches to explore such as Fly stitch, Berry Stitch, Slipped Detached Chain Stitch, Tete de Boéuf Stitch, and the knotted stitches such as bullion knot are often worked isolated in singles or pairs. Browse the stitch dictionary on my site for more. All of these stitches can be arranged in patterns or worked in a shape such as a circle, or a square to create units of pattern or texture.

If arranging stitches in patterns is a bit to easy for you, go on a stitch hunt and find stitches that can be fractured to create an isolated stitch. Just as detached chain stitch is a single unit of chain stitch take a trawl through the stitch dictionary and find other stitches that can be worked in an isolated way. So for instance look at Algerian Eye makes wonderful patterns or take a look at Herringbone square and think about how herringbone stitch has been fractured and then arranged in a square.

My tip is to look at a stitch and think about how it might look if only one or two stitches were created – then think about how those units might be arranged into patterns. Hopefully, by the end of the month, you will see stitches in a different way and they will spark your creativity.

Beyond TAST is a season of 4-6 weeks that allows time to explore an aspect of a design, technique, style, or family of stitches. See the TAST FAQ for more details.

TAST2012logo

How to take part in the Take a Stitch Tuesday challenge

If you are new to hand embroidery the challenge is to learn the stitches. Learn stitch 6  and share what you have learnt. If you are an experienced embroiderer enjoy Beyond TAST and explore this stitch for a month. Try and give your work a modern twist and share it online so beginners can see what can be done with a little imagination.

Where to share

Stitch a sample of stitch 6, photograph it, put in online on your blog, Flickr site, share it in the  TAST facebook group or where ever you hang out online. If you have a blog leave a comment on the Chain stitch page with your full web address. Don’t forget the http bit of the web address so that your address becomes a live link so that people can visit your site and see what you have done.  For Flickr people, the group is Take a Stitch Tuesday. Hashtags are #TASTembroidery and #PintangleTAST on places like Instagram etc.

If you need more information the challenge guidelines are on the TAST FAQ page.

Crazy quilt template set 2 Have you seen my Stitchers Templates?

As someone who loves crazy quilting and embroidery, I designed these templates with other stitchers in mind. With my templates, you can create hundreds of different patterns to apply to your stitching and crazy quilting projects. They are easy to use, totally clear so you can position them easily and they are compact in your sewing box.

Templates set 1 you will find here 
Templates set 2 you will find here 

a tangle of pinsFollow Pintangle and have it delivered to your inbox

You can have Pintangle delivered to your inbox by using the ‘follow’ feature in the sidebar. Just enter your email address, and when you get the confirmation email make sure you say yes and you are all set! If you are on a mobile or tablet you will need to scroll to the bottom to find the ‘follow’ feature.

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The Spring 2018 issue of Crazy Quilt Quarterly is out

Crazy Quilt Quarterly Spring 2018 coverThis is a heads up for all my readers out there who are interested in Crazy Quilting. Just a quick note to let you know that the Spring 2018 issue of Crazy Quilt Quarterly is out. First up however I want to point out that I am not affiliated with this magazine and do not gain financially from this review.

Gradually over the last few issues the page layout of this publication has changed. As you can see in the few screenshots featured Crazy Quilt Quarterly under the guidance of Pamela Kellogg has moved away from the cluttered scrapbook style page decorations and now has a cleaner modern look and feel. I find it much easier to read when the work is featured against a clean background. Often crazy quilting is visually complex enough without adding more page decoration!

This issue has too much in it, to review every single article, so I will touch on a few highlights. Featuring cover artist is Karen Guthrie inside also holds some delicious eye candy from Betty Pillsbury, Nina Burnsides and Genevieve Tracey.

I really enjoy the contemporary work of Fiona Price. In this issue Fiona describes here textile experiment “Woodland Solace” that is made with hand dyed fabric scraps, lace and Lutradur. Fiona builds here interestingly textured surfaces from all sorts of fabrics even old dish cloths and packaging that she then dyes. After adding these to a foundation she then builds further with embroidery beads. Her work is delicious and I really enjoyed reading about her process.

Crazy Quilt Quarterly Spring 2018 pageEveryone loves stories and I delighted in the article from Karen Anthonisen Finch about Arpillera Storytelling Quilts – A South American Tradition. I have always enjoyed the playful folk art of these textile traditions.

As usual this issue is full of tutorials for various projects such as Florence Martin’s Crazy Patch Tin,and something different in the form of tutorial on a crazy patch window valence from Mary Anne Richardson. For those who like 3D projects Kathy Shaw has shared both pattern and directions on how she makes her Muse Doll. Brenda Sandusky has shared how she makes Christmas ornaments (some ideas there to tuck away for the end of the year)

Crazy Quilt Quarterly Spring 2018 is available here via MagCloud as I said at the start of the article I am not affiliated with this magazine and do not gain financially from this review I just think its a good issue and like the modern direction Pam Kellogg is taking the publication in.

a tangle of pinsFollow Pintangle and have it delivered to your inbox

You can have Pintangle delivered to your inbox by using the follow feature in the sidebar. Just enter your email address, and when you get the confirmation email make sure you say yes and you are all set!
If you are on a mobile or tablet you will need to scroll to the bottom to find the follow feature.