Buttonhole Picot — 2 Versions

Buttonhole Picot

These are two versions of Buttonhole Picot Stitch that I use.

The first version — and the one most often documented, has a picot made of a bullion stitch. The second version is easier to work, as the picot is made of three chain stitches.

The second version interests me, as I was shown the second version when young and I often wonder if this is an Australian / New Zealand variety. I think it is easier to do, but that could be because I learnt it as a child.

I worked all the samples using cotton perle # 5.

Most often, this stitch is worked along an edge so the buttonhole stitches are usually worked close together. For the purposes of demonstration, I have spaced them a little apart, so you can see how the picot stitches are worked.

In all versions, you space the picot knots as required along a line of buttonhole.

Version 1 Buttonhole Picot made with a bullion knot

Buttonhole Picot V1 step 1Start with buttonhole stitches. When you reach the point where you want to add a picot, begin with the thread under the needle, and wrap the needle 2 or 3 times to create a bullion knot.

Buttonhole Picot V1 step 3Push the knot wraps snug to the buttonhole and pull the thread through. You may need to hold the needle flat to the fabric with your thumb as you pull through.

Buttonhole Picot V1 step 3Slide your needle from left to right under the last stitch, and, keeping the thread under the needle, pull it through. If you need to push the knot up snug, do so with either your needle or thumb.

Buttonhole Picot V1 step 4Continue along the line working the next section of buttonhole.

Buttonhole Picot stitch version 2

This is similar, but I think easier, as the picot knot is formed with a chain stitch.

The illustration samples are worked using cotton perle # 5.

As with the previous version you space the picot knots as required along a line of buttonhole. Normally the buttonhole stitches are worked closely together as an edging stitch. For demonstration purposes, I have spaced them a little apart so you can see how the picot stitches are worked.

Buttonhole Picot V2 step 1Start with buttonhole stitches. When you reach the point where you want to add a picot, slide your needle under the thread of the last buttonhole stitch but not through the fabric.

Buttonhole Picot V2 step 2With the thread under the needle pull your needle through so that you make a little chain stitch using the buttonhole as a foundation.

Buttonhole Picot V2 step 3Insert your needle into the centre of the chain stitch but not through the fabric. Wrap your thread under the needle and pull your needle through to make a second chain stitch.

Buttonhole Picot V2 step 4If you want a larger knot you can make a third chain.

Buttonhole Picot V2 step 5Next, slide your needle from right to left under the last stitch, and, keeping the thread under the needle, pull it through. If you need to push the knot up snug do so with either your needle or thumb.

Buttonhole Picot V2 step 6Recommence regular your buttonhole stitch and bring your needle tip out next to the picot and continue along the line working the next section of buttonhole.

As you can see, the knot stands a little proud. Personally, I always find the rhythm of the second version easier than the first. I would be interested in people’s opinion.


15 Comments

  1. Here are my two variants.

    http://210920746822434353.weebly.com/1/post/2013/11/take-a-stitch-tuesday-2013-87-and-88.html

    As much as I HATE bullion stitches, I prefer the first — at least I think I know how to do it and I don’t have a clue how to do the second. I chalk that up to trying this late at night… But neither is very well done, IMO.

    This has been a disastrous month of stitching for me — only one of the stitches in October actually worked for me!

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