Hand Embroidery band sampler details 741-744

hand embroidery band sampler detail 741I have some more details from long band sampler which I would like to share with readers. If you are new to Pintangle this band sampler is 96 feet long or 29.38 meters- anyway its long ( you dont want to have iron it…) but it is only 6 inches wide and is made up of strips of fabric that have been joined together. If you want to know more about it you can read about it on my Sampler FAQ page.

Band 741 is very simple as it is 2 rows of Cretan stitch worked in silk buttonhole twist thread that is about the same thickness as cotton perle #5.  Technically it is a type of alternating Cretan stitch as one side of the stitch  is longer than the other.  I worked the two rows and added beads in a line down the middle.

hand embroidery band sampler detail 742

Band 742 is an experiment with threaded running stitch. Working in cotton perle #5 I stacked 3 lines of running stitch and then laced the apricot chainette through it before adding bagel beads.

hand embroidery band sampler detail 743Band 743 is another experiment with threaded running stitch. I worked 2 lines of running stitch in  cotton perle #5 before lacing it with a fine metallic yarn.

hand embroidery band sampler detail 744

Needlework sampler section 51 e

The last band is another example of a little journal element on my sampler. I recorded the Christchurch earthquake using a cotton perle #8 thread I worked the letters in back stitch. My daughter had lived and studied in Christchurch for 3 years at the Circus school there so I felt a connection to the city.

These close up details of my hand embroidery sampler are part of an on going series of articles. The thumbnail on the left is  the section of the sampler where these band appear. If you are interested in this section of the band sampler you can read about it here

Hand Embroidery sampler details 736-740

Hand Embroidery sampler close up detail 736I have more close up details from my hand embroidery sampler to share today

For those who do pulled thread embroidery I am sure you will recognise Ringed back stitch  in band 736. I worked it using a hand dyed silk thread. Since Ringed back stitch is a pattern based on back stitch it is was easy to give a traditional whitework stitch a contemporary twist by using colour.

Hand Embroidery sampler close up detail 737The next sample is also a and adaption of this stitch. If you peer closely ring back stitch has little diamond formed in between the rings where as this variety has little squares. It is bound to have a name as I am sure lots of stitchers before me have done this. I probably even have notes about it somewhere but I cant find them and I did not make a note in studio journal about it.

Hand Embroidery sampler close up detail 738The next little strip of stitching is a line of Algerian eye stitches and 6 satin stitches that are worked over two threads. I pulled the Algerian eyelets and probably poked a knitting needle into the  central holes to emphasise them more.   I worked it using the same hand dyed silk thread as I used in the sample s above. It is silk that is approximately the same thickness as cotton perle #8.

Hand Embroidery sampler close up detail 739The next sample is very easy stitch as it is threaded running stitch. In other words it is rows of running stitch that I have laced different threads through.

Hand Embroidery sampler close up detail 740

Needlework sampler section 51 e

The last band is another example of me adding a little journal element to my sampler. We had been in drought a very long time and the dams had been very low. This was a celebration as they reached a capacity of 65%. Dams at this level meant that we could water our gardens. So I stitched it on my sampler using a cotton perle #8 thread I worked the letters in back stitch.

These close up details of my hand embroidery sampler are part of an on going series of articles. The sampler is only 6 inches wide but it is 96 feet 5 inches or 29.3878 meters long you can read about why it came about and how it developed on the Sampler FAQ page

Hand Embroidery sampler details 731-735

Hand Embroidery sampler close up detail 735Two dramatic bands on my hand embroidery sampler are 734 and 735. Both are samples of Threaded Arrow stitch. Above is a band where I worked a line of arrow stitch and then a line of threaded arrow. The foundation Arrow stitches on all rows is worked in a hand dyed silk thread that is the same  thickness  as cotton perle #5. I then laced every second line of stitches with a slightly thicker thread.

Hand Embroidery sampler close up detail 734The second is  sample of threaded arrow stitch is 4 rows of arrow stitches that are arranged so that duel row face each other. The foundation thread is a linen thread and blue thread is a crochet cotton.

Hand Embroidery sampler close up detail 731Hand embroidery sampler detail 731 is a small unassuming line of crossed buttonhole stitch worked in a hand dyed silk thread.

 

Hand Embroidery sampler close up detail 733Detail 733 is an interesting variation of buttonhole called Fancy Bobbin Edging which I discovered in an old book called The Batsford Encyclopeadia of Stitches by Anne Butler. This book was published in the late 1970’s and looks very dated with black and white illustrations that are not always clear but there are some interesting varieties in it this is one of them.

Hand Embroidery sampler close up detail 732

Needlework sampler section 51 eDetail  732 is also Fancy Bobbin Edging  used to couch down some ribbon. The second line is Fancy Bobbin Edging spaced a bit wider. As you can see I was experimenting with it before I realised it looked better with a close spacing and then I hit upon the idea of changing the height of the vertical arms of the stitch in order to create a pattern.

I hope you enjoy seeing these close up details of my hand embroidery sampler which  are part of an on going series of articles here on Pintangle. The sampler is only 6 inches wide but it is 96 feet 5 inches or 29.3878 meters long you can read about why it exists on the Sampler FAQ page